{Type 1 Tuesday} August 2016

by Leighann on August 22, 2016

Type 1 Tuesday

Here are some tidbits that I have found interesting and wanted to share…

About that mom who’s not bragging about her kid

About that mom who’s not bragging about her kid

This isn’t necessarily about type 1 diabetes, but I know how hard won some small victories can be.

Read “About that mom who’s not bragging about her kid” on Washington Post.

Getting to Glucose Responsive Insulin – How “Smart” Will It Be?

Here is a great overview of what we might expect in responsive insulin (“smart insulin”).

“In theory, this next-generation insulin would work automatically in response to blood glucose: the higher the blood sugar, the more insulin is released or activated, and the lower the blood sugar, the less insulin is released or activated”

Read “Getting to Glucose Responsive Insulin – How “Smart” Will It Be?” on Diatribe.

Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label

Reading food labels is something people with type 1 diabetes do multiple times each day. The FDA has made some changes to the food labels including making the serving size in larger, bold print. Manufacturers will need to use the new label by July 26, 2018.

Read “Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label” on the FDA website.

nutrition label

The old label is on the left and the new label is on the right.

Diabetes Care in the School Setting: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association

This is a great overview of diabetes care at school and 504 plans.

“The majority of young people with diabetes spend many hours at school and/or in some type of child care program. Trained and knowledgeable staff are essential to provide a safe school and child care environment for children with diabetes. This includes the provision of care during the school day, field trips, and all school-sponsored activities in the school setting and in preschool, day care, and camp programs in the child care setting. Staff play a critical role in helping to reduce the risk of short- and long-term
complications of diabetes and ensuring that children are well-positioned for academic success and normal growth and development. The child’s parents/guardians and healthcare provider(s) should work together to provide school systems and child care providers with the information necessary to enable children with diabetes to participate fully and safely in the school and child care setting experiences.”

Read “Diabetes Care in the School Setting: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association” in Diabetes Care Journal.

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